The World’s Greatest Ambassador Of JOY

The world’s greatest ambassador of joy.

The Crown Prince of Basketball, Meadowlark Lemon, also known as the world’s greatest ambassador of joy was one of the most joyful people you could have ever known.  The Basketball Hall of Famer passed away on December 28, 2015 at the age of 83.  He was probably best known for the 24 years he spent with the Harlem Globetrotters.

Ambassador of Joy

Ambassador of Joy

Meadowlark Lemon was a man of faith who loved people and believed in giving back. Meadowlark brought joy to millions and was one of the sports world’s greatest role models. Meadowlark Lemon loved his country and the U.S. military. In fact, at this same time last year, he was overseas entertaining the troops and visiting the sick and wounded in military hospitals. Meadowlark had his own Christian ministry and it touched many. He prayed with President Ronald Reagan in the Oval Office and he witnessed to and prayed with Alabama Governor George Wallace at his bedside.

The life, love, and laughter of Meadowlark Lemon served to inspire an entire generation around the world.

The world's greatest ambassador of joy.

The world’s greatest ambassador of joy.

A gifted athlete and hilarious comedian, he is as renowned for his famous confetti-in-the-water-bucket routine as he is for hitting hook shots from half court.  Meadowlark is an outspoken champion role model who continues to supercharge audiences worldwide with his high energy, warmth, humor and inspiring message of finishing strong and how to live a life of JOY! [1]

As a legendary member of the Harlem Globetrotters, Meadowlark witnessed firsthand the changing tides of acceptance and virtue among the nations of the world. On the road, while performing before various diplomats, world leaders, celebrities, popes and many fans he learned that JOY is not the absence of adversity.  Meadowlark realized that JOY is the victorious way through adversity.[1]

His relentless pursuit to bring happiness to the masses will live on through generous donations to Meadowlark Lemon Ministries which is a joyful legacy continuing to bring joy into numerous communities around the globe.[3]

“Like most of my era, I remember, as a boy, my father taking me to see the ‘Clown Prince of Basketball’ and the Harlem Globetrotters. However, it will be Meadowlark ‘The Man’ that I was fortunate to get to know later in life and whom I will always remember,” stated Van D. Hipp, Jr.[2], who went on to say, “Meadowlark Lemon was one of the finest and most decent people I’ve ever known.”

Thank you for doing your part to honor the legacy of one of the world’s greatest ambassadors of joy, Meadowlark Lemon. You can go to his official website donate and support his ongoing ministries.[3]

Ambassador of Joy

Ambassador of Joy

“Long before athletes tweeted, and in-your-face dunks and tackles could be shared by millions instantly, Meadowlark Lemon became one of the most popular sports personalities in the world.” wrote Carla Rivera, a contact reporter for the Los Angeles Times, who continued, “His dazzling basketball skills and slapstick humor were a key attraction for perhaps the most famous basketball team ever, the Harlem Globetrotters. He became known as the “Clown Prince of Basketball,” appearing before presidents and kings and portraying himself in television programs, movies and cartoons.”[4]

[1] Sourced from the official website at http://www.meadowlarklemon.org/biography/

[2] Van D. Hipp, Jr. is the former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Army.  He is the author of the newly released book, “The New Terrorism:  How to Fight It and Defeat It.”  All of the author’s proceeds go to the National Guard Educational Foundation to fund scholarships for children of fallen Guardsmen.  www.thenewterrorism.com   Follow him on  Twitter @VanHipp

[3] Donations can be made at http://www.meadowlarklemon.org/

[4] Carla Rivera is the author of the article titled “Meadowlark Lemon dies at 83; ‘Clown Prince of Basketball’ spent 24 years with Harlem Globetrotters” and can be reached at carla.rivera@latimes.com.

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One Response

  1. Becky Capps
    January 10, 2016

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